Blogging Questions & Answers 5

By Daniel Scocco

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It is time for Blogging Questions & Answers! Many people said they love to read these posts, so keep the questions coming!

You can ask one either by posting a comment on this post or via the Contact Form.

1.
Earth-Byte.com
asks:

What do you recommend as far as getting your newly launched blog out into the intarweb?

I suppose you are asking how to get a newly launched blog promoted on the Internet?

Well, before getting started with the content and with the promotion aspects I would make sure that the blog is optimized. You can read some tips for that purpose on the article “Blog Setup: 40 Practical Tips.”

Once your blog is functional and optimized, I would also suggest writing some good content before promoting it. After all you don’t want the new readers to get disappointed with what they will find there.

There is no magic number here, but I would wait until you have at least 10 articles in place, some of them being pillar articles.

Finally, once all it set and the content is there you can start promoting the blog. Here are some activities that you might want to do initially:

  • Send emails to bloggers in your niche introducing yourself and the blog
  • Avoid begging for links, people will link naturally if the content is good
  • Get your posts submitted to some blog carnivals
  • Leave at least 10 comments every day on related blogs
  • Create some creative posts instead of recycling content
  • Participate in forums that cover your niche

2. Andrea Moore asks:

I run a relatively new (started May, 2007) blogspot blog that is starting to get a decent amount of traffic and links. Recently I’ve been thinking about transferring it to a WordPress blog with its own domain. My question is: what problems and issues can I expect in this transition, and what are the best ways to minimize its ill effects? If I buy an expiring domain with PR and links, will that help?

Let me start with your latest question. Buying an expiring domain with PR and backlinks is always a positive thing. Another benefit from that might be the age of the domain, which is also used by search engines to determine trust.

As far as transferring your blog to WordPress goes, I would do it as soon as possible. You will lose some traffic and some backlinks along the way, but it is definitely worth it. And the sooner you do it the fewer things you will lose.

Make sure to contact authority sites that were linking to you and ask them to kindly update their links, and switch the source of your RSS feed in the case you use Feedburner.

You can also read an article titled “Moving from Blogger to WordPress: Best Practices” that contains a detailed step-by-step guide for the transfer.

3. Bitten asks:

What would you say to a person whose native language isn’t English but he/she wants to start an English blog (because of bigger traffic)?

If your writing skills in English are good I would say go for it. I needed to make that same decision when I was starting out, and I decided to go with English due to the larger audience.

Notice, however, that at the very minimum you should be able to write clearly and without spelling or grammatical mistakes. Sure, we all make typos once in a while, but there are some blogs out there that you can’t even follow the reasoning of the author.

If your writing skills are not so good, therefore, I would go with a blog in your native language. Despite reaching a smaller audience, you’ll be facing less competition and you will learn the corner stones nonetheless. You can always create an English website in the future when you are more experienced and when you feel more confident about writing in English.

4. Mike asks:

What if you have a “non” web savvy market. I don’t think they get the whole RSS thing. I can send a lot of visitors to a new blog post, but the RSS doesn’t go up. Any suggestions?

If your audience is not web-savvy, there are two main things that you can do to increase the number of subscribers.

First of of all you can try to explain to them what is RSS. Add a “What is RSS?” link close the the RSS icon, and point it to a page where you briefly explain what is RSS and how they can subscribe to your blog using a feed reader.

The second thing you can is to offer email subscriptions. Feedburner makes it really easy to crate an RSS to email service. After setting this up you can place a subscription form on your blog where readers just need to put their email and click on the “Subscribe” button.

5. Scott asks:

I have put together a blog which has great content in my niche and I am looking to spend $ on advertising. This includes adwords, stumbleupon, msn, blogads, etc. I read your post about “7 ways to market your blog” and likely will end up doing most or all of them this month.

I am wondering if you have any other avenues for me to explore – basically at this point I am looking to test as many possible avenues as possible for 1-2 months then figure out what works best and optimize those.

Well, on the article you mentioned I covered pretty much all the “proven” promotional techniques. If you are looking for even more methods to promote your site, here are a few suggestions.

You could try Facebook flyers. Basically for $10 you can send 5,000 flyers to Facebook users. Supposedly you can target them, so you should be able to select groups that are related to your site. I have not tested it personally, so I am not sure about the results.

Secondly, you could also try sponsoring the development of a WordPress theme or plugin. Creating popular themes or plugins can be very good for your marketing strategy, since they will bring traffic, awareness and links.

Finally, you could also create a competition or a contest on your site. Looks like you have a good budget to work with, so creating a competition with interesting prizes is definitely something that would create buzz on your site.




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10 Responses to “Blogging Questions & Answers 5”

  • Bitten

    Thank you for your answer.

  • Daniel

    No problems man, I hope it was helpful.

  • engtech @ internet duct tape

    Facebook flyers have the worst click through rate (reference: http://valleywag.com/tech/a-deeper-look/facebooks-consistently-the-worst-performing-site-for-advertisers-242234.php
    )

    I covered some ideas for how to advertise your blog (including facebook) here: http://internetducttape.com/2007/07/07/ways-to-advertise-your-blog-on-a-shoestring/

  • Vikram

    Good answers Daniel, some drawn from your own experience!

    I would like to ask, that after the current PR update even big blogs who have lost their PR, are cutting out paid links (Yaro Starak for one) and requesting Google to reconsider. What would you do, if your PR fell?

    Although My PR has jumped from 0 to 4, some of the readers from my blog have asked how to get the PR back and If one does want to use Text Ads, Does Google Allow such ads if we put the No Follow Tag?

  • Eleena

    Is it ok to have a tip jar on my blog if I’m also participating in affiliate programs like Amazon and Skype? What’s the thinking about this? Tacky or ok to do?

  • Andrea Moore

    Thanks for your helpful answer. The article you linked about moving to wordpress was really informative.

  • Dave Starr — ROI Guy

    Very good selection of questions … and, as always, useful answers. I’m a a lot further down the blogging chain in terms of visitors and experience but I did start on Blogger and then switched to a dedicated WordPress mode. The suggestions you referenced will certainly help.

    @==> Andrea just do it … my traffic certainly went up after making the move and I know of others who had the same experience. My original blog is still on Blogspot with a an explanatory post that indicates where I moved to and I still get a few visitors every day referred by the old blog, so I don’t feel there was any real downside.

    @==> Bitten, examine yur motives regarding your dilemma. To chose the language you want to write in based on perceived traffic seems short-sighted to me. Last year I recal a statistic that indicated Japanese and then french were the two most common blogging languages … certainly today Chinese must run up near the top as well. I speak none of those languages, so how much sense would it make to try to start a blog in one of them because I might get more traffic. Your blog should be concerned with what you have to say, not the language you say it in. I live in the Philippines and have some Filipino friends who insist on blogging in English who really, really shouldn’t … but how to break it to them gently that their skills are not up to the task they have set themselves to? All that being said, it occurs to me a blog on the difficulty of blogging in English when being more fluent in another language has possibilities. “Thing’s I have learned, mistakes I have made, good examples, horrid examples, etc.”

  • Daniel

    Vikram, regardless of the PR changes I would stop selling links if you care for the site in question.

    You can’t go against Google guidelines if you want to rank well in their index.

  • Mathew

    Hello Daniel –

    I just found this blog and have enjoyed reading it!

    Just one question though wouldn’t your first tip on blog promotion be considered spamming?

    “Send emails to bloggers in your niche introducing yourself and the blog”

    Thanks!
    Mat

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