Google Cloud Storage, App Engine and Cloud SQL

By Daniel Scocco

As you probably noticed over the past couple of years there was a lot of change and innovation on the web/cloud hosting space. Amazon is one of the most popular examples, with its S3 plataform, but many companies followed close behind.

One that impressed me so far is Google. Their Cloud Storage platform looks very competitive and cost effective, to the point that I am considering to start using it for my future projects. For instance, one thing you could do is to host your WordPress site there.

The main WordPress files would still be on your own hosting account, but all your data, even images, could be stored on Google’s services, which probably would improve the access speed and the reliability. Check out this post on Google’s Developers Blog explaining how you can do it.

Another very interesting service they are offering is called Google App Engine. It allows you to develop and host your entire web application on Google’s infrastructure, using either Java, Python or Go. The service is also free initially, and only when your reach a certain consumption quote you start getting charged for it.

Finally, if the main aspect of your website/application is a database (as is often the case), check out Google Cloud SQL. Again it allows you to host your MySQL database on Google’s infrastructure, increasing the speed, reliability and security.

It’s a nice time to be a web developer, huh?




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7 Responses to “Google Cloud Storage, App Engine and Cloud SQL”

  • Kevin Muldoon

    It’s an interesting idea. I’d like to see how this set up and see the pros and cons of setting it up this way.

    Also, as much as I love Google, and I do, I’m always skeptical of new products they bring out as they have a habit of releasing too many products and then not focusing on them.

    Google Drive is a good example of this. I signed up to that because it was cheaper than DropBox. Big mistake. It was littered with sync problems – which is one of the main reasons for using a cloud service. In the end I returned to DropBox.

    Feedburner is another example. They’ve effectively killed the service.

  • Kevin Muldoon

    It’s an interesting idea. I’d like to see how this set up and see the pros and cons of setting it up this way.

    Also, as much as I love Google, and I do, I’m always skeptical of new products they bring out as they have a habit of releasing too many products and then not focusing on them.

    Google Drive is a good example of this. I signed up to that because it was cheaper than DropBox. Big mistake. It was littered with sync problems – which is one of the main reasons for using a cloud service. In the end I returned to DropBox.

    Feedburner is another example. They’ve effectively killed the service.

  • Value Blogging

    Absolutely, a lot of changes in fundamental changes in the world of web hosting and application, but many are not willing to move from the free platform, I suppose more like the simplicity and ease.

  • SWH Energy

    I am already using Google’s cloud platform to host my site – Blogger! 🙂

    I like Google’s services, but I am not a fan of their support. Not sure if they do it better with their enterprise/paid platforms.

  • Mark Llego

    Thank You so much for this great post. I tried Google Cloud SQL Today, hopefully I can implement this on my growing community.

  • Simon Shaw

    I agree with the comment above regarding Feedburner, but google is like any other successful internet business. Try lots of things and identify which ones are worth sticking with and investing in. They are hoping for the next big earner. Feedburner unfortunately has bitten the dust.

  • Mark Kens

    One thing I like most about Google is constant improvement to provide help to internet users and webmasters. That is the reason Google is in top. Google cloud storage and app engine will really help webmaster in securing and fast accessing data. It also help users in getting information quickly.

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