Seth Godin’s Presentation on Making an Impact

By Daniel Scocco

Last week, while browsing through my RSS reader, I came across an interesting video presentation from Seth Godin. The video was taken from the “Business of Software” conference, and it was about making an impact and creating effective business models around software.

Even if you are not trying to build a software company, however, you’ll probably get many business insights from the video, so check it out.

Some key and curious points:

  • Competence is no longer scarce. In fact it’s becoming a commodity.
  • Successful tech companies don’t necessarily have extremely talented technical people.
  • But they do tend to have talented marketers and businessmen.
  • The Human Spam method doesn’t work anymore.
  • Getting people to talk about and interact with your marketing is essential on most sectors these days.
  • People are always looking to belong and to get connected with other people.
  • Successful businesses create movements and tribes.



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6 Responses to “Seth Godin’s Presentation on Making an Impact”

  • Justin

    Any useful information is always welcome. I am listening to the Seth Godin video while I type this. Thanks….

  • Fiona at BlogPiG

    “Successful tech companies don’t necessarily have extremely talented technical people.”

    But it helps! Even if you’re not building software for a technically advanced audience, sometimes it takes technical genius to make something which operates effortlessly. Behind apparent ease and simplicity for the user can lie some very complicated code!

    Godin has it right about most things when it comes to running/promoting a successful business, though.

    The ‘tribe’ theory applies itself beautifully to blogging and making a living as a blogger – you need to lead a tribe to find success as a blogger (I can recommend Godin’s book: Tribes)

  • Himanshu Chanda

    This is indeed a great resource. Got a new channel (Business of Software) to learn new stuff!

  • Web Marketing Tips

    Boy one hour … would love to see this on coming weekend.

  • Mark Etsemov

    I take the “competence is no longer scarce” comment to mean that the Internet has expanded the online marketing universe to increase the overall number of competent marketing people and agencies. Since online marketing can be entirely virtual, there’s no intrinsic reason to select a local (or regional or national) agency — unless the campaign requires specific understanding of the local market.

    But the _percentage_ of competent (however you want to measure this) online marketing people and agencies has probably declined, as the Internet has lowered barriers to entry and blurred the distinction between top shelf agencies and wannabees. As Scott Adams said, “On the Internet, no one knows you’re a dog.”

  • Garious

    Revolutionary as ever. This is how I feel about Seth Godin. Every time I hear him speak or read any of his work, he shakes my beliefs some paradigm shift has to take place.
    I agree 100% that competency is easy to find especially that, thanks to online freelancing, you easily get any talent you need anywhere. Distance is no longer a barrier which means that the talents that are available at your fingertips are thousands of times greater than they used to be in the past.
    I also agree that this’s not enough for a thriving business, unless you manage to hire “talented” marketers as well.
    If you ask me which factor is more important competency or intelligent marketing, I would say both are equally important. What’s the use of having a great product that you only know about? What’s the use of having a genius marketer to promotes a mediocre product? One negative review of a pissed off customer will wash away all his hard work!
    I guess learning how to find the best technical and marketing talent is what you need for a thriving business.
    This is exactly how Donald Trump: he chooses the right candidates for one business and leave them to take care of growing it and on to the next business.
    Thanks, Seth Godin. You never cease to inspire me.

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