Internet Possibilities to Investigate

By Daniel Scocco

The Internet is changing and evolving so fast that sometimes we can’t keep up with all the useful tools and possibilities that emerge. A while ago I came across a post from Chris Brogan that talked about 57 of those possibilities that you should investigate. Here are the first 10:

  1. Think about FriendFeed as your own personal newsroom or communications center.
  2. Revisit Reddit as a news source, and also as a roll-your-own tool for information clustering.
  3. Use Alltop as an idea-starter, or as competitive analysis of content spaces.
  4. Cook up six powerful searches on Twitter Search and add those RSS outputs to your feed reader.
  5. Visit Slideshare weekly and search for new presentations to learn from.
  6. Use YouTube as a source for lectures and learning. Use Magnify as a curation tool.
  7. Rediscover what’s interesting in Delicious/Popular. Go back and find tags that matter more to you.
  8. Reconsider your current blog reading list. Do some quick math. If it is more than 60% related to your industry, you’re doing yourself a disservice. Find the outliers.
  9. Pick at least one news source from outside your country to monitor information from a different perspective. One of my sources is The Guardian.
  10. Subscribe to at least one blog with a strong opposing view. Learn from it. Learn where your position is different. Learn how they say what they say successfully. Discover what has impact and what doesn’t.

Through the rest of the list he talks about web-based work, video, small and local stuff, mobile applications and money. It is worth a look.



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12 Responses to “Internet Possibilities to Investigate”

  • radyo dinle

    I think item #8 is a particularly good piece of advice. If you’re totally absorbed in reading only about your particular industry, you’re probably missing out on a lot of good ideas and risk becoming stagnant.

  • medyum

    I think I’ll test my own limits by trying to work through the list.

  • Tyrone

    Well I think this list is sufficient and one must have a sufficient time to bring it to use.

  • Jabna

    Thanks for the list. I hadn’t heard of Alltop before. I just checked it out. I like it. Easy search and isn’t too much info to be overwhelming.

  • Aravind Jose T.

    Very good pointers.
    Thanks a lot.

  • Chung Bey Luen

    It is a nice list. We can base on our need to implement some of them but not all because we don’t have so much time.

  • Do You Dave Ramsey?

    wow, great recommendations… what’s the old line about doing the same things and expecting new results… or the idea of surrounding ourselves with ‘yes men’… this is a great set of ideas for challenging and stretching ourselves… I think I’ll test my own limits by trying to work through the list.

  • BLOGBOOZE

    It’s very informative I learned few things like Alltop and Slideshare from this article.

    Next thing i’m going to do is read all those 57 and apply them in my tasks. Thanks Daniel and Chris for the information.

  • I Need A Blog Idea

    Great read. I agree that it’s difficult to keep up with all of the changes to the Internet. Even if you don’t use all 57 you can easily add a couple of dozen and become more efficient and informed.

  • SEO Tips

    Great find, I ve skimmed through it going to give it a nice detailed read now.

    Nice find though 🙂

  • APFTDude

    I think item #8 is a particularly good piece of advice. If you’re totally absorbed in reading only about your particular industry, you’re probably missing out on a lot of good ideas and risk becoming stagnant.

  • SATISH — Technotip.org

    It was a nice read. The 1st thing I am going to implement is

    “Reconsider your current blog reading list. Do some quick math. If it is more than 60% related to your industry, you’re doing yourself a disservice. Find the outliers.”

    Thanks for sharing…heading to read more

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