The Resources I Used to Learn Python

By Daniel Scocco

Last week I explained why I decided to go with Python as my first programming language. Today I want to talk about the resources I used to get started.

Before jumping into code I wanted to get a general picture of what computer science and programming was about. I had some ideas, but I figured it would be a good idea to cross check them. After researching a bit online I found the Wikiversity website, which proved to be very valuable. The website is part of the Wikimedia foundation (the guys behind Wikipedia), and it aims to provide free learning materials and courses.

The course I used there was the Introduction to Computer Science one. After going thought it you should have a good understanding of how computers work, what are algorithms, how to solve problems using computation and so on.

After that I purchased a book called Head First Programming. It aims to teach you the basics of programming while you solve practical problems and tasks. The language used is Python, so it will help you get started with that as well. Costs around $30.

Another very useful book I started reading in parallel was How To Think Like A Computer Scientist. It also uses Python along the way, but it’s open source, so you can read it straight from its website (or even download the PDF).

Once I finished those two books I could already create some basic programs in Python, and I was having a lot of fun doing it. Then I figured it was time to take on something more advanced, and I started looking for online courses from universities.

I came across the MIT Open Courseware program, and decided to follow the Introduction to Computer Science and Programming course. They have all the video lectures, slides and test materials available and completely free.

This course is probably the best introduction to computer science you’ll find anywhere online or offline. You need to understand the basics of programming and have a solid math background to follow it, but if you manage to watch all the lessons you’ll definitely be on the right track to become a real programmer. I was so impressed with the course that I decided to donate money to the MIT Open Courseware program (my name is on their website!).

And that is pretty much all I used to learn Python and programming initially. After that it was just a matter of practicing a lot, coding games, small programs and the like.

Next week I’ll talk about moving from Python to C, and about other books and resources I am using these days. Stay tuned.



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4 Responses to “The Resources I Used to Learn Python”

  • Justin | Mazzastick

    Sounds like a great and easy way to learn about computer science.

    I started my blog because I enjoy writing and sharing ideas but I actually do enjoy learning all of the little nuances of programming and coding.

    I will definitely look into this program.

    • Web Marketing Tips

      Doing those little design change even when you do not know coding is simply awesome.

      This give satisfaction when you realise that you can modify your blog.

      @ Daniel

      Yes we were waiting for this post after reading your last post on Python.

  • Louie Sison

    Like a very famous quote say: “Coding is Poetry”. I was actually first into programming and web development until I full time blogging.
    Thanks for the share, Daniel

    Louie Sison

  • mohamed shajid

    wow sound is good, for the university studies that we should pay money to them!

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